Archive for Thursday, April 15, 2010

Water Work

New features to be added to wastewater plant

Bonner Springs utilities director Rick Sailler, at left, and Wastewater Treatment Plant superintendent Jim Neal stand inside the new dewatering building, currently under construction, and next to the new belt press, which the city has purchased to replace an older model. Construction on the new building should be complete by June. Sailler talks about the progress in this Five Questions.

Bonner Springs utilities director Rick Sailler, at left, and Wastewater Treatment Plant superintendent Jim Neal stand inside the new dewatering building, currently under construction, and next to the new belt press, which the city has purchased to replace an older model. Construction on the new building should be complete by June. Sailler talks about the progress in this Five Questions.

April 15, 2010

Q: When did work start on the new dewatering building and why was it needed?

A: October 2009 — that’s when construction started anyway. The planning was almost a year before that. The existing dewatering equipment is basically within the original Wastewater Treatment Plant operations building … we needed to get the existing belt press out of the operations building due to air quality concerns, health concerns and space. A belt press is a mechanical device that basically squeezes the water out of the wastewater sludge, which is (bio-) solids that we remove from the treatment process.

Q: Besides already having purchased a new belt press, what has been accomplished thus far?

A: The walls are up and the equipment’s been delivered. The electricians are there working on electrical, floors have been poured … The main thing I wanted the citizens of Bonner to know … is it’s a green infrastructure-type building. It’s constructed in what they call insulated-concrete walls, so what they did, they put up … Styrofoam basically, and they pour concrete inside those walls and it’s very energy efficient.

Q: What are the benefits of the construction?

A: Well, basically it’s replacing existing equipment that is 30 years old and has basically met its life expectancy … It’s new equipment. We expect it to last about 25 to 30 years. We hope the building is a 100 year building.

Q: How much money is this costing the city?

A: The total project cost is $900,000. It’s being bonded, and that includes the building and the equipment and the design.

Q: When do you expect construction to be completed?

A: We’re shooting for about June 1.

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